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Chapman 2015 Video Essay Slashfilm

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, watch the opening monologue from John Mulaney and Nick Kroll at the Independent Spirit Awards. Plus, see how I, Tonya and Battle of the Sexes depicted their respective sports in such a realistic way, and learn about how Paul Thomas Anderson uses hot dog shapes in all of his films. Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, see how the visual effects artists from I, Tonya made it look like Margot Robbie was a professional figure skate. Plus, watch a video essay breaking down how director Denis Villeneuve uses color on film, and see how the opening crawl for Star Wars: Episode 9 can fix the supposed missteps of Star Wars: The Last Jedi for dissatisfied fans. Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, see how some of cinema’s most famous monsters compare to each other in size. Plus, a closer look at how acts are structured in Marvel movies by taking an in-depth look at the script for The Avengers and also take a 360-degree tour of the Saturday Night Live studio from the main stage. Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, watch Will Ferrell‘s auditioning tape when he was just a comedian trying out for a spot on the cast of Saturday Night Live. Plus, learn about the art of production design from The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and see how visual effects were employed to make multiple versions of Noomi Rapace in the sci-fi film What Happened to Monday?.Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, listen to a convincing defense of Ridley Scott‘s most recent sci-fi sequel, Alien: Covenant. Plus, go behind the scenes of Chris Hemsworth‘s new war drama 12 Strong, and see how Saturday Night Livecreated the vibrant music video for their music video sketch all about Stanley Tucci. Read More »

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The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, a video essay illustrates how Steven Spielberg expertly uses sound design to immerse you in the world of his movies. Plus, find out how Gremlins changed the world in more ways than one, and watch a trailer for Star Wars: The Last Jedi edited in the style of the Avengers: Infinity War trailer. Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, find out which of the many different cuts of the original Blade Runner you should watch. Plus, see an incredible shot-for-shot breakdown of one of the most exciting sequences in Raiders of the Lost Ark, and watch as Jimmy Kimmel goes undercover on Reddit, Wikipedia, IMDb and more. Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, find out how HBO is keeping you from seeing movies the way they’re supposed to be seen. Plus, learn about an interesting theory about the glowing briefcase in Pulp Fiction, and watch as an aspiring talk show host with autism takes over The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, watch the TARDIS console from Peter Capaldi’s tenure as Doctor Who torn down one last time. Plus, watch a video essay deconstructing the train scene from Sam Raimi‘s Spider-Man 2, and see one climactic battle from Star Wars: The Last Jedi recreated like an 16-bit video game (but beware of spoilers). Read More »

Dunkirk is a feat of cinematic splendor, a visual and auditory assault that is less a standard film than it is a visceral experience.

There is barely a plot to Dunkirk — you could probably summarize the entire thing within five minutes — but it makes the film all the more affecting. There’s no need for dialogue telling you who, what, when, where, why when you can read the fear in the battle-worn soldiers’ eyes and the apprehension in every British citizen’s face. But is that enough to create a substantial silent film? A YouTube video essay channel decided to find out.

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(The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.)

In this edition, a video essay takes a closer look at the ending of No Country for Old Men, ten years after the movie hit theaters, and a Ghost in the Shell featurette looks at one of the few things the movie did right, which is the incredible practical effects created by Weta Workshop. Plus, Eclectic Method created a catchy track composed entire of Star Wars sound effects, and it’s better than most songs you hear on the radio nowadays.

For more casual moviegoers, the ending of No Country for Old Men was one that was perplexing and even a little disappointing. But Joel and Ethan Coen are two of the most gifted filmmakers working today, so you just know that ending has some significant meaning. It’s something that has been discussed by critics and viewers in the 10 years since the film hits theaters, and now Screen Prism dives deep into what the ending means and the metaphors at work. If you know someone who says they don’t like they ending of No Country for Old Men, show them this and see what they think.

Next up, the outstanding work that Weta Workshop put into the Paramount Pictures adaptation of the anime Ghost in the Shell gets the spotlight in this featurette. The practical effects in this film are quite impressive, and no matter what you think of the movie, you can’t deny that some spectacular work was done in Hollywood’s attempt to bring this story to life.

Finally, if you’ve yet to hear anything on the radio that sounds like it could be the song of the summer, Eclectic Method might have the winner. Using only Star Wars sound effects, everything from lightsabers igniting and clashing to punches, laser blasts, R2-D2’s beeps and everything in between is featured here in musical way that will get your foot tapping.

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